Reinstating a Remington Rand

Dan Rogersby Dan Rogers
Guns and Gunsmiths Contributor

I recently received a unique piece of history to work on, so naturally I had to make a write up about it. A good friend of mine came to me with a Remington Rand 1911 from his personal collection and asked me to give it a once over, go through it, and see if it was fit to shoot. Naturally, I jumped at the opportunity. It meant a great deal to me because first off, my friend is a veteran and secondly, we both have family that were World War II veterans. Continue reading


Project MAX — Part 2

Dan Rogersby Dan Rogers
Guns and Gunsmiths Contributor

If I did not put you all to sleep in Part 1 of this article, you know I managed to rechamber my .357 magnum handi-rifle to .357 maximum. I did this using nothing more than a vise and simple hand tooling. Now some ammunition would be required to test the rifle. Since .357 maximum ammo has not been widely loaded by ammunition companies in roughly 30 some odd years I would have to manufacture my own. Continue reading


Project MAX–Part 1

Dan Rogersby Dan Rogers
Guns and Gunsmiths Contributor

.357 max to be exact. Yes, I said .357 max as in .357 Remington Maximum. The .357 max is not to be confused with its smaller cousin the .357 magnum. The .357 max was originally developed as the .357 super magnum by Elgin Gates. Gates had a series of “super magnum” pistol cartridges he developed through the 1970’s. This same cartridge was introduced to the commercial market by Ruger and Remington as the .357 Remington Maximum in 1983. It is essentially a .357 magnum case lengthened by .3 inches with more powder and higher operating pressure to obtain velocity gains over its smaller cousin. Continue reading


Retro CAR-bine

Dan Rogersby Dan Rogers
Guns and Gunsmiths Contributor

A few months back I wrote an article on a retro AR project where I set out to replicate the M16A1 rifle my dad carried in the Army. In doing so I seem to have opened a can of worms. The project made me debate a retro carbine project. My dad occasionally carried a CAR15, hence the spelling of my title. CAR15 was a catch all term that applied to carbines the military carried before the M4 existed. Since my dad’s carbine was a 10.5-inch barreled carbine, I shelved the project not wanting to obtain the tax stamp needed for the SBR. However; about three months ago my wife brought home a shiny new gunzine for me. I suppose I had been well behaved enough for her to bring me a treat from her outing to the bookstore. On the cover was at what first glance seemed to be an M4 carbine. Closer inspection of the photo revealed something a bit more unique than your standard M4. It seemed eerily familiar with its A1 lower, C7 receiver, XM style stock, and M4 contoured barrel. Continue reading


10/22 “Super Tune”

Dan Rogersby Dan Rogers
Guns and Gunsmiths Contributor

I use the term “super tune” loosely. I am by no means suggesting I am an authority on 10/22 rifles, nor is this AGI instructional material. I can, however, most definitely say that my simple 10/22 bedding job quickly devolved into a full blown “super tune”. I will also add right here at the beginning there is a range review! If you like you can skip to the pictures, tell me how poorly I shoot, and pick up on the next article. For all of those still interested in the story, it all started out a little like this. Continue reading


Springfield 67F Rides Again

Dan Rogersby Dan Rogers
Guns and Gunsmiths Contributor

We all have one, that derelict old firearm sitting partially assembled in the back of the safe or closet. This is the story of mine. No, it is not a full on restoration project. I also realize it is not as impressive as David Fey’s Ithaca project, but it may spur some of us on to tackle our forgotten friends lying in the deep recesses of our gun safes. Continue reading