American Boy Scout Rifle

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

Certain firearms seem like old friends and my brother’s American Boy Scout Rifle is a good old friend. I don’t remember life without this rifle. It was one of the first firearms that I fired. The gun is actually a military version of the Remington No. 4 Rolling Block Rifle. The No.4 Rolling Block Rifle was first manufactured in 1890 and was an excellent “youth gun”, as it fired .22 and .32 rimfire cartridges. Remington sold a lot of these rifles and they were very popular.BoyScout1 Continue reading


Smith & Wesson Military and Police Revolver

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

M&P1While going through their father’s things, my Mom and her sister came across an old Smith and Wesson revolver that had belonged to my Grandfather. The gun was stowed away in his trunk with some military memorabilia from WWI and an unopened bottle of whiskey. As I think about it, I believe that it would be a cold day in hell if the things in that trunk were ever in need of use again. My Grandfather was a kind and practical man. He owned a Winchester 1873 that he kept at his grocery store and the revolver was hidden away at home in case of emergencies. Continue reading


How Becoming A Gunsmith Makes You A Better Husband

Or, How To Convince Your Wife That Buying More Tools And Firearms Is Better Than A Vacation!

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

In today’s firearms industry, the professional must contend with rising costs for brass and raw materials, frightened or disgusted looks from neighbors as you go to work or the range to test fire, political witch hunts, let alone personal safety and Murphy’s Law. Continue reading


The Winchester Mystery House & Firearms Museum

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

For the gun enthusiast, no trip to California would be complete without a visit to the Winchester Mystery House. In this article, G&G contributor Robert Dunn describes his visit to this famous landmark. Make sure to add this incredible house to your itinerary when you next visit California. Continue reading


The Dunn Armory… Savage Model 755A

By Robert Dunn
AGI/GCA Video Producer,
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

I guess at this point in my life, I could be considered a collector of firearms. Within my collection, I have a collection of long recoil operated shotguns. This would include Browning Auto 5s, Remington Model 11s and my most recent acquisition, a Savage Model 755A. All of the previously mentioned shotguns are based on John Browning’s designs. Like Remington, Savage Arms also licensed the design from Browning. The Model 755, at first glance, does not look like the other “humpback” shotguns I love so much, but the way the gun functions is very similar to the rest of the pack. Continue reading


The Liberator Pistol

By Robert Dunn
AGI/GCA Video Producer,
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

Image07-p03I love firearms that have a rich history or a good story behind them. The Liberator pistol sure meets those qualifications! These one-shot pistols were produced during WWII and were dropped in mass quantities into occupied/enemy territory. The idea was that resistance fighters and civilians (who were disarmed) could use them to put one well placed shot into the dome of an enemy soldier. The soldier’s weapons could then be “liberated.” Continue reading


Mystery Matchlock

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

Throughout time and around the world, man has made some historic finds by accident. In Thailand, the Emerald Buddha which now rests in Bangkok’s Grand Palace, was originally found after lightening struck a chedi (temple) in the mid 1400s and revealed the statue’s precious green jade from under it’s stucco covering. All through Western Civilization, many statues and treasures were painted over to make them look cheap and valuables were cast into cement. Many relics were lost or destroyed before archaeologists and historians have realized their finds. I own such a piece that could have easily been resold or even thrown away. Continue reading