A Brief History of the Evolution of the Shotgun

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

The shotgun can be defined just as the word implies; a gun that fires shot. Shot is defined as spherical balls, varying in size, which are used as ammunition. The history of the shotgun goes back as far as that of the firearm itself. Early firearms have many traits in common with the modern shotgun and there is a sort of gray area as to what could be considered a shotgun until the features of a rifle became more individualized. The predecessors of the shotgun, such as the arquebus, blunderbuss and even the musket could be considered a shotgun of sorts, as they could all launched both single and multiple projectiles at once when the weapon was fired. These firearms all had smooth bores and were shoulder fired, just as a shotgun. Continue reading


.22 Long Rifle Rimfire Cartridge

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

I learned to shoot using the .22 Long Rifle rimfire cartridge and it is still one of my favorite and most used rounds. The rimfire’s low felt recoil and quiet report make it a good cartridge for beginning and youth shooters. It is a great small game hunting cartridge as well as being a good round for economical tactical training. While growing up, shooting up a few boxes of .22 rimfire ammo was good cheap fun. Continue reading


Tips for Combining Current Technologies and Gunsmithing

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

The use of current technologies (such as computers and cameras) in Gunsmithing would seem to go hand in hand, however, because of fear, different methods of working and learning, generation gaps and individual special interests, these technologies are sometimes over-looked and feared instead of being embraced. Many times, it is merely laziness that is the limiting factor in learning and fear is but an excuse. If making a job faster, safer, and easier is not “your cup of tea”, you could just lop off a couple of fingers from your hand and this should balance out any ideas or concepts that could help you out in the future. Continue reading


Remington Model 1889 Shotgun

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

One day my brother came by the house and dropped off our friend Jerry’s shotgun to see if I knew anything about it. It was obvious it was an old Remington as it has Remington Arms Co. stamped onto both sides of the receiver. After a little bit of research, I determined it was an early vintage Grade 2, 12 gauge, Model 1889 side by side shotgun. Continue reading


Ruger Alaskan Revolver

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

I remember back in 2005 when the Ruger Super Redhawk Alaskan revolver was introduced, and I have wanted one ever since. At the time, the revolver appealed to me because of its 2ó inch barrel and the radical .454 Casull chambering. I was living in an urban environment and owning an Alaskan was more of a novelty, to my mind, than a practical firearm I would actually carry for selfdefense. Thus I never purchased one. Continue reading


Marlin Firearms

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

John Mahlon Marlin was born in Connecticut in 1836. His career started as an apprentice tool and die maker and he worked as a machinist with American Machine Works. During the Civil War, John worked at the Colt manufacturing plant and in 1863 he started manufacturing single shot pistols in New Haven, Connecticut. He founded his own company, Marlin Firearms Company in 1870. Marlin was making derringers and revolvers and then expanded into producing other firearm designs from there. The post war turbulence made small concealable handguns a desirable choice for self-protection and in turn, Marlin sold a lot of those types of firearms. Marlin took over production of the Ballard single shot rifle in 1875, which was popular with hunters and sportsman. Production of the Ballard rifle was discontinued in 1891. Continue reading


Mountain Gunsmiths and Their Firearms

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

I have always been fascinated with old muzzleloaders and the gunsmiths who built them. Early vacations to Williamsburg, Virginia exposed me to Master Gunsmith Wallace Gusler, as well as the Gunsmith and Blacksmith shops in Colonial Williamsburg. The fact that a gun could be built by one man from start to finish has held my interest throughout my entire life. Continue reading


The Dunn Armory… Savage Model 755A

DunnBy Robert Dunn 
AGI and GunTech Video Producer, 
AGI Pro Course Graduate, GCA Charter Member

I guess at this point in my life, I could be considered a collector of firearms. Within my collection, I have a collection of long recoil operated shotguns. This would include Browning Auto 5s, Remington Model 11s and my most recent acquisition, a Savage Model 755A. All of the previously mentioned shotguns are based on John Browning’s designs. Like Remington, Savage Arms also licensed the design from Browning. The Model 755, at first glance, does not look like the other “humpback” shotguns I love so much, but the way the gun functions is very similar to the rest of the pack. Continue reading