Ask the Gunsmith with Jack Landis

Jack LandisAGI Technical Services Manager, Jack Landis, answers a question
from an AGI customer that many of you will find educational.

Correcting the Barrel/Cylinder Gap on Smith & Wesson Revolvers

Our customer Craig wrote to ask; “I have a S&W Model 29 revolver that has a cylinder to barrel gap of 0.010. Is there an economical way to reduce this gap to about 0.002 to 0.003?” Continue reading


Product Review–Beretta 92 Carry Compensator

with Jack Landis
AGI Technical Services Manager

One of AGI’s Pro Course graduates has a business called Moonlight Firearms Technologies. Recently they sent a sample of their barrel compensator for the Beretta 92/M9 for Jack to evaluate. For those of you that carry such a firearm, this compensator is considerable shorter to those you often see on race guns, so it is suitable for everyday carry. Continue reading


Barrel Turning Lathe Fixture

with Jack Landis
AGI Technical Services Manager

If you ever need to set back a revolver barrel, or turn a barrel for any other reason, this handy fixture shown by Jack Landis will make the job easy and accurate. Jack made this fixture when he was a student at Lassen College. It is a simple tool (all the best ones are) that any of you with a lathe and a few tools could make for yourself. Continue reading


Gunsmith Project–Throating a Revolver

Jack Landisby Jack Landis
AGI Technical Services Manager

In this special 32 minute video┬áJack Landis give a detailed and complete run though on how to properly measure and deepen the forcing cone on a revolver. During the process he also shows you how to measure the barrel/cylinder gap and true the end of the barrel. This procedure isn’t as difficult as you may think and Jack takes you through the entire process in great detail.

This is the type of information and training that can be yours with training from AGI and their professional gunsmithing courses. CLICK HERE to get FREE information including a sample video.
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Free Gunsmithing Lesson

Jack Landisby Jack Landis
AGI Technical Services Manager

 

The Smith & Wesson Model 1000 Semi Auto shotgun of the early 1980’s was a pretty good and very reliable shotgun, at least in my experience. The gun was built in Japan by Miroku and, like most of their guns, was of high quality and sound design. There was also a pump gun, the Model 3000, and an evolutionary version of the 1000 called the Super 12.

S&W Super 12

S&W Super 12

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