Restoring the Winchester Model 57–Part 4

By David E. Fey
AGI Graduate, GCA Member

The final installment in David Fey’s excellent article. If you missed any of Parts 1 through 3, look under the Authors tab at the top of the page for his name.

The rust bluing of this hand-polished barrel was very rewarding. I kept the bolt in the white, used Brownells Dichropan IM on the barrel and receiver, and Belgian Blue on the remaining metal. The Dichropan IM resulted in a very deep and lustrous blue/black; the Belgian Blued pieces, on the other hand, came out a slate grey that contrasted well with the barrel and receiver. Continue reading


Restoring the Winchester Model 57–Part 3 of 4

By David E. Fey
AGI Graduate, GCA Member

Draw Filing and Polishing

I wanted to learn about hand polishing and started with AGI’s Metal Refinishing and Hot Caustic Bluing Course which gave a good lesson on power polishing, but demonstrated hand polishing only to the extent of showing what to do when power polishing won’t work. Gene Shuey demonstrated a shoeshine technique with 240 grit to achieve a satin finish on a barrel that appeared to be in satisfactory condition, that is, light to no corrosion. Continue reading


Restoring the Winchester Model 57–Part 2 of 4

By David E. Fey
AGI Graduate, GCA Member

Firearm Disassembly

(CLICK HERE if you missed Part 1 of this article)

The reader will recall that the gun was already significantly disassembled, so most of the remaining work was on the receiver/barrel and the bolt. I had in mind Ken Brooks’ D/R video advice to sort out the parts in the order they were removed as I disassembled but because this project would (eventually) take several weeks, I dropped the parts in a large organizer whose compartments kept everything safe. Between tasks I closed the organizer lid and put the works in a drawer in my workbench. Continue reading


Restoring the Winchester Model 57–Part 1 of 4

By David E. Fey
AGI Graduate, GCA Member

My story starts like many a good gun story: a bag o’ parts and the dream of greatness from ruin. The ruin in question was a rusty rifle; the greatness turned out to be a beautiful .22 rifle and a profound appreciation for an old school technique, hand polishing. I believe this is a lost art for one profound reason, it’s a lot of work! Way, way more effort than mechanical means, and for that, I thank Da Vinci, Fulton and their engineering and materials predecessors for making our modern lives easier. Continue reading