Gunsmithing Project–Bedding a Rifle Part 1

Jack Landisby Jack Landis
AGI Technical Services Manager

In this two-part video Jack Landis shows a simple, straightforward way to bed a rifle that will help improve accuracy in your own hunting or target gun.

Jack walks you through the entire process so you have the complete “Recipe for Success.”

This video will be shown in two parts because of its length. Look for Part 2 next week! Continue reading


Tip From The Workbench#84–Extractor Cuts

kenBrooksby Ken Brooks
AGI Instructor and Master Gunsmith

In this video AGI Instructor and Master Gunsmith Ken Brooks answers a question from a Gun Club of America member about extractor cuts in barrels. Ken shows you a messed up extractor cut and then takes you through the procedure to clean it up and restore it one step at a time. Before it’s over you will gain more insight into these cuts and know the tools and techniques you can use to restore them. Continue reading


Ask the Gunsmith with Bob Dunlap

Dunlap by Bob Dunlap
AGI Instructor and Master Gunsmith

This time Bob answers two more questions from Gun Club of America members. The first one involves a Remington 870 with an action that is feeling a “Hang up” syndrome with its extended mag tube. The second question is regarding a Remington 1100 with a feeding problem. In both cases Bob pinpoints the possible causes quickly and makes his recommendations and as usual we gain a bit more insight into how his mind works as he makes his analysis. Continue reading


Mills and Lathes for Gunsmiths

Jack Landisby Jack Landis
AGI Technical Services Manager

One of the most frequently asked questions that I get is, “What size and type of mill and lathe should I get, now that I’ve ordered the machine shop course from AGI?” OK, here goes . . .

Having learned to use the lathe and mill at Adult School, and then at Lassen College during the summer NRA classes, I can tell you that I REALLY wished I’d seen Darrell Holland’s course first. Darrell is an excellent instructor and you will learn what you need to buy to get the job done. The way to do it, is to watch the lathe and mill portions first, THEN buy your lathe and mill. Continue reading


Ask the Gunsmith with Bob Dunlap

DunlapBob Dunlap
AGI Instructor and Master Gunsmith

Gun Club of America Silver and SilverPLUS members get complete access via web, email and phone to the AGI instructors as one of the major benefits of membership. The “Ask The Gunsmith” segment of the monthly Guntech video magazine is one of the most popular articles.

In this video GCA member asks Bob about headspacing a Chinese remake of the Ithaca 37 in order to cure extraction/ejection problems. When Ken Brooks did the Disassembly/Reassembly Course on the Ithaca 37 he spoke of how the Chinese remake had some problems because the Chinese had only incorporated some of the changes since the early design. Continue reading


Gunsmith Project–Throating a Revolver

Jack Landisby Jack Landis
AGI Technical Services Manager

In this special 32 minute video Jack Landis give a detailed and complete run though on how to properly measure and deepen the forcing cone on a revolver. During the process he also shows you how to measure the barrel/cylinder gap and true the end of the barrel. This procedure isn’t as difficult as you may think and Jack takes you through the entire process in great detail.

This is the type of information and training that can be yours with training from AGI and their professional gunsmithing courses. CLICK HERE to get FREE information including a sample video.
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Unanswered Gunsmithing Forum Questions–Can you help?

There are a number of gunsmithing question that have been posted in the forums section of this website that have not been answered. Can you help your fellow G&G subscribers?

Make sure you visit the Forums regularly if you want to help other gun owners with your years of wisdom and experience. Or post a question there yourself and let other help you in return. This is our community–try to be a part of it if you can. Continue reading